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 DRUb. OLICY FF_LINDRTION TEL:20">-_o,"-_O07 AI:,r "_- #_i 12:.52 lqo 003 P nS
 3
 I.
 The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) is a comprehen-
 sive regulatory measure that divides the u_iverse of' haz-
 ardous drugs i_o five different categories of substances
 (so-called schedules}, which determine the severity of
 restrictions on doctors' and patients' access to controlled
 drugs) Drugs cats be 're-scheduled" or "de-scheduled"
 onty if the DEA makes certain statutori_y-mandated find-
 ings. Schedute t drugs are subject to the most severe con-
 trols and give rise to the harshest penalties for violations
 of these controls; they are deemed to be the most danger-
 ous substances, possessing no redeeming value as medi-
 ,.cines. The Act sets forth statutory criteria to be used in
 determining whether a drug should be placed in Schedule
 I:
 (A) The drug or other substance has a high potential
 for abuse.
 (B) The drug or other substance has no currently
 accepted medical use in treatment in the United
 States.
 (C) There is a tack of accepted safeW for use of the
 drug or other substance under medical supervision,
 21 U.SoC.  gi2(b)(1).
 The Act contains a somewhat different set of criteria
 for Schedule I[:
 (A) The drug or other substance has a high potential
 for abuse.
 (B} The drug or other substance has a currently
 accepted medical use in treatment in the-United
 _When ig enacted the CSA in 1970, Congress placed marijuana
 in Schedule I. From that time, petitioners have :indefatigably
 sought to obtai_ a change in marijuana's etas:_ificatioa, The long
 'm_d checkered history of this proceeding and an explanation of
 the ccmplex statutory scheme are detailed in 2N'ationaf Org. for the-.
 Reform v/ Marijuana Laws o. lngersolf_ 497 l_.2d 654 (D.Co Cir.
 1974); Nati. vna_ Org. for the Reform of Mar_iuana Laws v. Drug
 Enforcement Admin., 559 F.2d 735 (D.C. Cir, 1977).
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